Thursday, May 29, 2014

Thyme and Nectarine Gimlet

Thyme and Nectarine Gimlet

So, last week a made a nectarine cocktail because I couldn't resist the sweet aroma of them on display in my market.  Well, this week, I walked in there with the intention of buying pineapples but those were right next to the nectarine display, still sitting there, wafting nectarine smells in my direction.  Who could resist wafting nectarines?

Thyme and Nectarine Gimlet
I pureed them in my little mini chopper and reached for the vodka.  Out of vodka.  What??  How does that even happen?!  Alright, technically I have about a dozen bottles of vodka but they're all flavored and I didn't think any of them would play well with this fruit.  Gin, on the other hand, might.  And the savory taste of fresh thyme should work well with the sweet nectarines.  A little touch of elderflower to add dimension and we went straight into holy yum territory.  Cheers!

Per Serving:
1 Nectarine, pitted
2 oz. Gin
1/2 oz. Elderflower liqueur
1/2 oz. Lime juice
1/4 oz. Simple syrup
1/2 Teaspoon fresh thyme leaves

Place the nectarines in a blender or small chopper and puree until smooth.  Pour into a cocktail shaker and add the gin, elderflower liqueur, lime juice, simple syrup and thyme.  Fill with ice, shake well and strain into a chilled cocktail glass.  Garish with a sprig of thyme, if desired.

6 comments:

  1. Love the flavors in this drink so much!!

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  2. Anita this is MY kind of drink, what a beauty! I think gin sounds like the perfect choice!

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  3. This is a gorgeous cocktail and I love the flavor combo! I'm kinda happy you were out of vodka because gimlets are one of my favorites ;)

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  4. Cheers for sure! Yet another fabulous cocktail for summer. And it has my favorite herb - thyme.

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  5. Is there something I could use in place of the elderflower liqueur?

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    1. Hi Heidi - there really isn't anything else like it but you can certainly omit it from the drink. It won't have quite the same finesse but it will still be tasty. If you have a chance to pick up even a small bottle of St. Germaine, though, you'll find lots of uses for it and it's quite a special flavor. I hope that helps.

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